Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Your Ikigai on #LinkedIn (part 5 of 5)

ikigaiwithjapanesetitleYes, ikigai (pronounced icky-guy) and it means “a reason for being,” a Japanese philosophy I just became aware of that I want to share and would like to have you add its concepts to your LinkedIn profile.

It consists of 4 intersecting circles, each one comprising 3 subconcepts and the intersection of all segments define your ikigai, your raison d’etre, your reason for being.

Each day this week I will explore a new circle with you and by Friday we will wrap up with the finale, in essence, why you do what you do, your ikigai. Yesterday I spoke of What You Are Good At. 

Today: The Ikigai of LinkedIn

We spent the past 4 days exploring the circles above. As we developed the thoughts around them, and the ideas they evoke for discussion on your LinkedIn profile, they pointed towards the intersection, that square in the middle, your ikigai.

The fillet, if you will..The sweet point. Your raison d’etre.

Your need to self-express your unique reason to be a contributing member of society and a prospective professional in your field.

Now you need to draw all these threads together and stitch your story: not what you do, not who you are or where you do it, but give us your higher thought and best written and visual articulation on LinkedIn: “why do you do what you do?”

Also, how do others say how well “you do what you do?” Ask them to endorse the right skills they know you possess and commit to writing a recommendation about an aspect of your expertise.

It’s mission, passion, vocation, and profession, all brought together to give a casual reader of your LinkedIn profile a memorable and intensive idea of you, enough to activate them to contact you for more information.

Not a tease, but a start of a great professional relationship, because we are all made of up more experience and possibilities than what we show on LinkedIn. Me too.

We are amazing, but need to show yourself as amazing-er than the competition. Repeat the mantra.

We’ve now gone full circle.

Ikigai: why you.

Please email me what your ikigai is. I’d be glad to learn that from you since you know mine. 

 

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Today's LinkedIn Nugget

It’s Ikigai week! (part 4 of 5)

ikigaiwithjapanesetitleYes, ikigai (pronounced icky-guy) and it means “a reason for being,” a Japanese philosophy I just became aware of that I want to share and would like to have you add its concepts to your LinkedIn profile.

It consists of 4 intersecting circles, each one comprising 3 subconcepts and the intersection of all segments define your ikigai, your raison d’etre, your reason for being.

Each day this week I will explore a new circle with you and by Friday we will wrap up with the finale, in essence, why you do what you do, your ikigai. Yesterday I spoke of What You Are Good At. 

Today: What You Can Be Paid For

We can be paid for a lot of possible occupations, within and without our experience.  I could flip burgers and so could you. But I don’t fill my own teeth. I hope you don’t either.

Our journey in our life’s work, up, down and all around, is profession plus vocation. That’s your career, right? Where else to tell it than LinkedIn?

The intersection of profession and vocation should deliver you a comfort zone, an ahhhh! moment, but don’t rest on your proverbial laurels. Readers of your profile have limited attention spans. Competitors and new entrants are changing our world very rapidly and electronically. You cannot afford to take a breather lest you are left behind.

And there’s no time to feel empty, so again, I disagree more than a bit with the chart.

You may think that I would go on and on here about this topic. Not really. You already know my philosophies, views, angles and sentiments about telling your true career story on LinkedIn. Not your resume but your story, “why.”

If you don’t know how to do this, call or email me for a consultation. I may just open your eyes wider.

Tomorrow, the crescendo, the finale, the ikigai of LinkedIn.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

It’s Ikigai week! (part 3 of 5)

ikigaiwithjapanesetitleYes, ikigai (pronounced icky-guy) and it means “a reason for being,” a Japanese philosophy I just became aware of that I want to share and would like to have you add its concepts to your LinkedIn profile.

It consists of 4 intersecting circles, each one comprising 3 subconcepts and the intersection of all segments define your ikigai, your raison d’etre, your reason for being.

Each day this week I will explore a new circle with you and by Friday we will wrap up with the finale, in essence, why you do what you do, your ikigai. Yesterday I spoke of What the World Needs.

Today: What I am Good At. 

I am fortunate now to combine my passion for helping others get unstuck with my profession(s). I feel I provide a valid and useful service to clients who refer me to others without my asking. So without going further about me, I suggest you answer the innermost questions that passion and profession tug at you with:

  • do you love what you do?
  • what makes you excited to get to work on Monday morning?
  • how do you show what you love doing?
  • how do others comment on what you do so well?
  • how did you learn to be so good at this?
  • how do you do it well now?
  • how can you do it even better in the near future?
  • what professional goals do you have?
  • do you need certification or augmented learning to stay on top of your field?
  • are you a thought leader in your area of expertise?
  • how do you rub proverbial elbows with the other thought leaders?
  • how do you help others as much if not more than they help you?

and so on, as my mind races. Yours will too.

These answers are needed and must be articulated well in your LinkedIn profile.

And the intersection of passion and profession is NOT uselessness and certainly more than mere satisfaction. If you feel useless or just marginally satisfied, you need to take steps to remedy the malaise.

Change of attitude, job, field, industry, etc, is good. Scary, yes. But still good, hopefully, yet you need to, and you have to want to want to try.

Start renovating your LinkedIn profiles with the narrative of why you do what you do and how well others say you do it. That’s just a start…Tell us what you are good at. If you don’t, no one else will want to.

Tomorrow: What You Can Be Paid For

 

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

It’s Ikigai week! (part 2 of 5)

ikigaiwithjapanesetitle

Yes, ikigai (pronounced icky-guy) and it means “a reason for being,” a Japanese philosophy I just became aware of that I want to share and would like to have you add its concepts to your LinkedIn profile.

It consists of 4 intersecting circles, each one comprising 3 subconcepts and the intersection of all segments define your ikigai, your raison d’etre, your reason for being.

Each day this week I will explore a new circle with you and by Friday we will wrap up with the finale, in essence, why you do what you do, your ikigai. Yesterday I spoke of What You Love.

Today: What the World Needs
This one is an easy one for me to write about as I am just finishing my book, the intent of which is to bring nonprofit professionals’ profiles to a higher standard to tell why them and their mission.

What the world needs is more sensitivity to whatever you as a nonprofit pro or contributor or board member or volunteer thinks is important. There’s a whole lot of intervening needs and competitive organizations seeking donor dollars, time, attention and energy.

What the world needs is more conversation and mutual respectful understanding, not the polarization of right and wrong, shades of gray in seeing both sides of topics that are controversial. IMHO.

Part of my mission is to help nonprofit professionals do a better job of expressing their “why,” more like their for-profit counterparts do on LinkedIn. Hence the book (not a to be perceived as a cheesy ad, but a demonstration that I take this mission seriously enough to commit time and resources to it.)

I couple to this mission my vocation as a LinkedIn trainer, coach, and author to write on this topic as no one has yet done so. Yes it’s true, no one has written a book on LinkedIn for nonprofit professionals. I did. I used 16 years of experience speaking to and learning from nonprofits and showing them how to improve themselves, to which I added my LinkedIn viewpoint.

Mission accomplished. Vocation added to mission. The by-product is a new book, due out in late May.

The intersection of mission and vocation, according to the chart above is

  • “excitement” (plenty of that to see the book become a reality). I can’t tell you how exciting it is to hold your book, fresh from the publisher!
  • “complacency” to which I disagree, as my passion and my mission are intertwined to whatever fulfillment I will accomplish providing something the nonprofit world certainly needs. I also offered the professional practice world my earlier book with the same  intent. I would suggest changing the word “complacency” to “optimism” or “visualization.” I have experienced those.
  • “uncertainty” is I suppose one thing that we have no control over as vulnerability and changes in our world impact us all at different levels. The uncertainty arising for the economic aftermath of 9/11 pointed me towards nonprofits as prospective clients. It was a good move for me but one I did not foresee until the dust settled. Some good things come out of uncertainty.

What’s your “What the World Needs”? We have lots of opportunity to think about that  in today’s uncertain world.

Tomorrow: the next circle: What You Are Good At

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

It’s Ikigai week! (part 1 of 5)

ikigaiwithjapanesetitleYes, ikigai (pronounced icky-guy) and it means “a reason for being,” a Japanese philosophy I just became aware of that I want to share and would like to have you add its concepts to your LinkedIn profile.

It consists of 4 intersecting circles, each one comprising 3 subconcepts and the intersection of all segments define your ikigai, your raison d’etre, your reason for being.

Each day this week I will explore a new circle with you and by Friday we will wrap up with the finale, in essence, why you do what you do, your ikigai.

What You Love (topmost circle)

It’s the passion you bring with you for something that you would do first, would rather do than any thing else. It’s the mission you seek to accomplish, above all others. The intersection of passion and mission is what you would take extreme delight in doing,  and feel that you accomplished something well, a feeling of mental and emotional  fulfillment.

I try not to make this blog to much about me, but will use my insights as an example for you today (and perhaps the other days this week to make my point. Your observations and “fill-in-the-blanks” will be different).

What do I love? If you know me, it’s definitely eating my way through New York City, exploring all it offers to educate and enlighten me: its tastes, smells and textures, its origins and melding of food combined with the cultures and that deliciousness that I crave. It’s my passion.

Additionally, “hunting” as I call it to find a new fave, showing others what I know and enjoy, where to buy these items best, seeing them enjoy it too, and introducing them to other tastes and aromas they would never try on their own, while trying to make myself understood to someone who doesn’t speak English and succeeding with some new story to tell about New York and its hundreds of cultures: it’s a mission of sorts, to share the goodies, so to speak.

The intersection of my passion and mission: a meal well eaten, snacks sought and experimented, all sated and well quenched: it’s the delight of the knowledge that I have appreciated and enjoyed anew and renewed.

Does it make me money? Am I an expert and good at it? Does it make the world better? The 3 answers: no, but I’ll think of how to find a way; not yet, but I keep practicing; and while it is not my intent, it makes me a little bit more a global citizen.

The LinkedIn connections to his circle? None really, but I do share when asked about a great place to sit down and try something new, so message me on LinkedIn and I will share bakeries, small shops in the Bronx, deli sandwiches, you name it.

What’s your “What You Love”?

Tomorrow: What the World Needs

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Meet my electronic friend “David”

voice iconLinkedIn profile improvements can turn into whole renovations for some of my clients. It takes a lot of planning, creative forethought, and writing. That process requires a few revisions and edits, which leads to typos, and I know that all too well!

Microsoft Word’s spell check is not perfect by any means. Good but not great. I have found that reading my work out loud to myself is another method of perfecting my writing.

But I recently discovered something that’s been right in front of me all the time, but I never used. Word has a function to have a mechanical voice read your material to you over your speakers. And it’s really good.

MSWordreads

  1. Open a Word document, select “review” from the top tabs in the blue header, then click “Read Aloud” from the second row of instructions.
  2. That opens the controls on the far right of the screen for the automated voice that will read the document to you. Place your mouse anywhere on the document and click the > arrow om t he controls, and you are being read to.
  3. Choose from various speeds of reading, forward. backup, or pause, and in various voices (I like “David”).

Final edits are in play on my new book right now and this function has really helped me send a better manuscript to my editor as I discovered inconsistencies, duplicated words, poor grammar, and other syntax errors.

I suggest you use this function too when rewriting your LinkedIn profile using Word. 

There’s an idea that you can use, right away.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Drumroll: the cover of my upcoming #LinkedIn nonprofit book

I have always thought nonprofit professionals need a LinkedIn course and book just for them.

So I am pleased to announce they are on the way!

The title of my book is “You, Us, Them: LinkedIn Marketing Concepts for Nonprofit Professionals Who Really Want to Make a Difference.”

NPObookcover

and the back cover summarizes the premise of the book:

You: One person making a difference, telling us what’s dear to you and meaningful in your work, as only you can. Appear the best you can be on LinkedIn, approachable and active, so we can cheer you on as you achieve your next milestones. Be sure your personal LinkedIn profile fits within the intentions of your nonprofit organization’s brand.

Us: The power of the group’s coordinated message, inspiring and successful. The message to the business community on LinkedIn must be on-point and concise, everyone in the organization showing a side of the mission in their individual profiles, with no weak links.

Them: All kinds of people who have not yet contributed to your cause but are available to you to research, and selectively market to. When they are inspired by your cause, they offer you their expertise, time and money. On LinkedIn, they are businesspeople and business entities: attention-deprived, questioning, and return-on-investment-driven. Appeal to both their intellect and their emotional desire to help, as we all pay it forward.

Are the three incompatible? Not if you work on LinkedIn using the concepts I showed you.

Cohesive? Certainly. This will take work, but it is attainable. Feed and cultivate it continually. Collaborative? Ah, the best of all worlds, all three rowing the boat in the same direction.

The book is coming late May 2018. I expect to have the online course up in late summer.

Get ready!

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

After a “thank you” on #LinkedIn

you_are_welcome (2)Yesterday I advised you to take time and thank others.

Rinse. Repeat.

Today I want to turn to the next step, saying “you are welcome,” “my pleasure,” or “you deserve it” is one thing, but demonstrating it on LinkedIn has quite a bit more impact.

Rinse. Repeat.

Here are a few ideas:

  • Refer one great connection to another, or to a few others, as the matchmaker. Articulate the connectivity in the intro and let the sparks fly.
  • Mention a connection by typing an @ in front of their name and click their ID from a drop down menu that appears so their name now appears in blue in the body of your post.  Then their connections and yours see what you have offered.
  • The same process can mention their company name.
  • Suggest your colleague joins a LinkedIn Group you find especially intriguing or valuable.
  • Comment on someone else’s comment, so much more lively and rewarding than a simple “like.” Atta-boys and -girls included here need to tell why this is important or useful to you, and to others.
  • Share published articles and original essays that willfind new audiences and help them in some way(s).
  • And one more: pick up the phone and have a conversation to catch up on news and/or to keep each abreast of progress in careers or business prospects. Radical idea, huh?

Sometimes “you’re welcome”s almost seem like repeat “thank you”s. There’s nothing wrong with that!

 

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

The simplicity of a “thank you”

thankyouIt’s an all-too-common aspect of our electronic speed-of-light life, we fail to thank someone.

An article I came across serves as a great reference point in this context. The author takes the scheduled time to see it working and so do I, although I’m not quite as organized as she.

Perhaps you do too, or perhaps you (and I) could do better.

Rise above the pace and the low common denominator of competitors in any or all of these obvious ways:

  • We have a meeting and agree on some follow-ups, and afterwards it’s only good form to thank them. Choose your medium of communication, but do it.
  • We are referred to someone, converse, appreciate the potential to become colleagues. You agree to connect on LinkedIn, and whoever initiates, this is the time to, thank them for the observations and time spent, then repay with the connection invitation as a prospect of nurturing them back.
  • We reacquaint with an old colleague by chance meeting and send a nice-to-see you-again message as a soft thank you message.
  • We receive a phone call,  decide there is additional work to achieve, on one or both parties, and we touch base afterwards to outline the next steps so everyone is focused: another soft thank you touchpoint.
  • And one more, thank someone with a LinkedIn endorsement for a skill they demonstrated their expertise to you, or better yet, write them a recommendation without their asking for it. What a great way to thank them!

Be a thanker. You will be noticed and appreciated back.

Thanks for reading my blog today.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Wrong! (cue the buzzer sound)

family-feud-sound-effects-family-feud-wrong-answer-buzzer-sound-effect-youtubeOn a game show, at the incorrect answer, an annoying buzzer sounds.

That’s what I heard in my head last week when a colleague approached me with a simple question, something her experience with LinkedIn did not provide an answer to. So she asked me.

She wanted to publicize an upcoming free event as widely as possible and asked who should post the share on their LinkedIn home page:

  1. her, with 500 connections, or
  2. a public relations expert with 13,000 LinkedIn connections (don’t get me started how he could possibly really know 13,000 people!)

I answered:

“The simple answer is: if you have 500 connections and he has 13,000, when you post the information about event as a “share” on your LinkedIn home page, exactly that many people will be notified of the post, respectively. So it makes logical sense that he is the logical person to prefer to post the ad rather than you.”

So she referenced me and my reply to that PR person and he replied back to all that I was wrong:  that my friend with her 500 connections would have as wide a distribution as he would with his 13,000.

BUZZER!

Three things are happening here:

  1. He is assuming my friend will set the distribution to “Public” or “Public + Twitter” when he makes his post. It is not a correct presumption that businesspeople read all that comes over their screen on LinkedIn; in fact they look at, but probably do not read, only a selection of what trusted friends and well-regarded colleagues post, and share even less, after being barraged by the daily surge of material on and off LinkedIn (buzzer),
  2. He is standing firmly behind an incorrect assertion; when you are corrected from an erroneous understanding it is not good business practice to refute, but rather, be mature and learn from your mistakes. That disqualifies the PR guru from further playing another round on my my game show, (buzzer, lovely parting gifts) and/or
  3. Perhaps 13,000 connections only boils down to 500 who really want to truly help, more proof to me that promiscuous linkers on LinkedIn can (spread a “disease” of misguidance and poor practice, something that can be cured with my dose of LinkedIn medicine (buzzer).

Ah, another nonbeliever (that PR person) to save from himself, one of so many for me to convert as the LinkedIn evangelist…but I’m not holding my breath…