Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Leaving on a jet plane; will be back again

flyingToday it’s a short post.

I have to go travel this morning and visit a sick relative.

Not a fun trip but a responsibility.

She is an author, a mother, an accomplished person. Optimistic, funny and brave.

We compare notes on articles we write and update on family members, benchmark each other’s careers. Hers is being cut short. It pains me that I may never see her again.

As we all know, life is short and fleeting. Every time we “touch” someone we have an impact. If you reach out someone who is in pain or hardship (or hopefully, after a win or a success), it’s the right thing to do. Not because this is top of my mind right now, but just in general. Gestures, as I have written before, count!

I’ll be back on Monday (skipping tomorrow’s post as I know you will understand) and restart fresh, lightened, enlightened and complete after seeing her.

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Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Did you notice? I Linked-In to you x 2.

atmI goofed. I prescheduled 2 posts for yesterday, one after the other.

Perhaps you thought I just had a lot more to say yesterday, but no, I try to meter these blog posts I write in advance to send out once a day at 8 am.

So I started thinking, what if I started doubling my blog installments, my long-form LinkedIn Posts, LinkedIn updates, 2x the output?

Would anyone notice?

Perhaps some of you. Perhaps not all of you, that’s not meant to insult, just a realization this is human nature in our attention-deprived busy schedules.

PS, I won’t be doubling my writing, only a rhetorical question.

So today, this is it. All you get.

Pull up yesterday’s blog post (either one) and it’s my contribution to you today just in case you missed one or both of the editions yesterday.

Like going to the bank…use LinkedIn to earn interest on your learning and branding. Deposit more than you withdraw.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

The Start-up of You: you’re always in beta, right?

startupofyoutweetprofilepicI always refer to a powerful book or two in my educational sessions.

I have listened to one in particular, The Start-Up of You, in recorded format at least 8 (!) times.

Each time I gain another nugget.

It makes me think harder, and it contributes to positive results in my daily business life. I strongly recommend it to you, not surprisingly.

I mentioned the book in my talk for Avvo Lawyernomics this past weekend and one attendee was kind enough to livetweet it out to inform others:

startupofyouAvvotweet

Let me know if you like the book. I know you will!

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

@LinkedInHelp did just that

Read from the top down:

HelpcenterAvvo

The back story:

I made a comment in my remarks about LinkedIn at the recent Avvo Lawyernomics conference that some bar associations require attorneys to retain their social media material for a year.

This was news to many attending my talk, and one tweeted to the conference app the next day with a query about how to best do this, an area I did not touch on with limited time to speak in my session.

As you can see, I directed him to the LinkedIn Help Center. (Normally I would provide the link to the actual answer, but I was sneaking in my last tweet in a plane and we had just been asked to turn our smartphones off for the flight.)

Without the access to the Internet until I landed, I was pleasantly surprised to see LinkedIn had taken the lead and provided the link for him while I was aloft.

I guess they watch for mentions of the words LinkedIn and Help Center. I guess they like to help. Much appreciated, @LinkedInHelp.

To see how LinkedIn’s robust Help Center can answer your questions, go to https://www.linkedin.com/help/linkedin?trk=neptune_help.

I would not expect them to tweet replies to your individual needs as was the case above, but the pre-published, searchable body of knowledge on Help Center is deep and they are quite responsive to trying to answer an escalated question that is not readily answered in their regular materials, all within the LinkedIn platform.

I can’t make this stuff up, folks!

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Like a winning @LinkedIn coach

coachI waxed as eloquently as I could on LinkedIn for an hour on Saturday afternoon to an audience of attorneys at the annual Avvo Lawyernomics conference.

The audience was receptive and energized by the end. I touched on my upcoming book, of course. You would too.

I received some very appreciative oral comments, tweets and requests to connect on LinkedIn. A few asked me to contact them to train them one to one.

Love it.

But by far the most memorable comment was from a man who sat all the way in the back of the room and waited for me to leave. He stuck his hand out and said, “Thanks for the great information and especially for not making this a sales job.”

Perhaps he arrived late in my session, after I said I am not employed by LinkedIn. Perhaps others came across as sales-y, in his experience sitting in educational sessions. Perhaps he just wanted to let me know he gained benefit from an hour’s time investment.

Like the winning coach leaving the court after a game, I felt the appreciation.

It’s a nice feeling.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

My book “LinkedIn Marketing Techniques for Law and Professional Practices”!

It’s coming, finally with a hard publication date: end of May.

It’s been a long term project, needed an adequate gestation period, like all worthy endeavors.

To my knowledge, it will be the first book on LinkedIn addressing marketing techniques using the new user interface that was rolled out in March.

The cover is embedded in the pre-sale flyer:

ABASbookflyer

Coming soon. Can’t believe it!

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Groups: those rumors of its death are greatly exaggerated

deathThanks to Mark Twain for the inspiration; the swirling rumors of the coming demise of the end of our own little worlds as we know it, especially goodbye to comfortable things we follow and use, can, and will be overdone.

To my point: smart people I respect lamented that reliable sources warned them of the news of LinkedIn killing Groups.

Not so, I learned today.

Sorry but it just didn’t make sense, and yes, LinkedIn recently made all groups “closed,” i.e., requiring a Group manager to approve the admission of a new member to the group.

LinkedIn is always changing, not always for the better, as it seems, but usually, finally, we all adapt.

So I poo-poo’ed the rumors and told others it ran counter to the purpose and message of LinkedIn: to create community among business experts, in this case Groups, as silos of similarly-interested professionals.

I awaited confirmation of my sentiments, and today it came.

link from a LinkedIn Help Desk article, aimed at assisting Group Managers with the upcoming back office changes to Groups, and an excerpt from it, demonstrate LinkedIn’s commitment to Groups.

Are there any plans to remove Groups?

We remain invested in the LinkedIn Groups experience. Professional conversations are at the heart of what LinkedIn has to offer. We’re always looking for new and improved ways to help our members engage with, share, and discuss timely and relevant topics with other professionals.

What is your long term vision for Groups?

We remain committed to being a platform where members from around the world can come together to discuss and share their perspectives and insights, and engage in a professional community that matters to them.

Too politically correct? Perhaps, and even while vague, like a news interview pivot of a politician in the proverbial swamp, it still has meaning. It seems to me that the mere mention of LinkedIn’s long term vision for Groups signifies there is one, so there we have it!

Too bad that rumormongers rummage to ruminate, rambling at the rumble of LinkedIn retirements!

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Sharing #LinkedIn-worthy content

sharingIt’s a challenge to be original and relevant, especially in your area of expertise, in what you update your connections with on LinkedIn.

Sometimes we just want to share an article we read and appreciated.

But too often we feel we have to only update with material in our sphere of knowledge. As if an update on a general topic all business people would appreciate somehow deflates our worth.

We read, we save for later usage, yet we fail to share with others. So consider the next time you read a general business piece, ask yourself:

  • “Could that be useful for others?”
  • “Why not make it an update on LinkedIn?”
  • “What brief intro can I add to the top of the update to let others know why this is a good piece?”
  • “Now I’ll copy and paste the URL of the article.”
  • “Voila-LinkedIn tacks it to the bottom of my update with a graphic to make it more interesting and eye-catching.”
  • “I just contributed to others’ personal learning.”
  • {Feel that satisfaction}….

Here’s an article I shared the other day, with the link to the article at the top and another link at the bottom on a similar theme (double dipping!):

sharearticle

The first link: https://lnkd.in/dwMqt47; the second: https://www.forbes.com/sites/work-in-progress/2011/03/28/no-you-cant-pick-my-brain-it-costs-too-much/#76735907426e

Don’t be too busy to contribute materials you curated materials to others for their benefit too.

 

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Publicity and @LinkedIn

writingPR, publicity, publications you appear/are quoted in, articles you wrote, being a published author…all are part of the entrepreneurial experience.

You want to announce them as they happen on LinkedIn. There are a few ways to do this and all should be considered for their respective audiences:

  1. create an update on your home page and tell the world what the article is about, why is it helpful and cite the URL. Speak to a global, multi-interest audience. That’s a start.
  2. post similarly in your relevant LinkedIn Groups, but amend the announcement to the audience’s interests. Don’t be lazy and copy-paste the same you placed in the home page update. This is important stuff.
  3. place another announcement in your company profile page, and reiterate how this is important and helpful to followers of your company profile page.

(I will stop here for an observation: all of the above tend to disappear with time and the addition of new material over top your announcement. So how do you memorialize this in a place that your reader and you can readily find it for later use?)

4. make an entry in your Publications section of your personal profile. Follow the direction that LinkedIn gives you as you fill in each data field and you will then have a permanent entry on your profile. An example from last year’s article (that you may still find helpful). Clicking “see publication” will take you here.

Publicaitons_spring2016Incarticle

Think of paper publications, as well as TV, video, radio, podcasts, etc, all in the mix of media we crave to accentuate our business and tell why we do what we do.

Make announcing and memorializing each instance of media exposure a LinkedIn priority.

 

 

 

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Do you exercise control over your @LinkedIn public profile?

controlYour public profile on LinkedIn is what people you are not connected to can see about you.

That includes those who Google your name and finds a search result of your LinkedIn profile.

That’s what recruiters and HR managers look at ..and most anyone else looking to see what your social media profile is…like the press, if that’s important to you.

You have control over what appears on your LinkedIn public profile.

Simply go to your profile by clicking “me” in the top line and selecting “view profile” in the blue font. Then on the far right side of your next screen click “edit your public profile.”

Then you will see what the public will see on your LinkedIn profile. Like it? Want to amend it?

On the far right side, under “customize your public profile,” select any and all radio buttons/check boxes (or deselect them).

I am highlighting your own ability, though you may not have exercised it, to establish ongoing control over what appears on your public personal on LinkedIn. You are in charge:

customizepublicprofile

and the above list goes on further below what I have shown you, allowing you to control the appearance of each section on your public profile.

Of course the quality of what you say in each section is up to you. Or me to coach you…

So look at yourself as others see you and selectively limit your personal information on your LinkedIn public face to the world.

Or not.

It all depends on your personal preference….